Coffee Jelly in the Ancient City

On Saturday morning, I arrived in Kyoto, Japan.* Originally known as Miyako, and later Heian-kyo, Kyoto received its current name during the 11th century. It became the capital of Japan in 794, when the Japanese emperor moved there with the Imperial court. Kyoto remained the official capital of Japan until 1869, although the military government moved to Edo at the order of Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1603. My son, the Sophomore, spent the last three months at a university in the northern part of Kyoto. He’s sent me photographs of himself at various sites of interest: It comes with creamer (as any self-respecting coffee should): The ancient

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If it’s Friday, it Must be Tokyo…

By the time you read this, I’ll be on my way to Tokyo. In addition to being the Japanese capital, Tokyo is the largest city in Japan and the most populous metropolitan area in the entire world. One look at the subway map is enough to tell you…you’re not in Kansas any more: In 1603, Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (who will make an appearance in some of my later Shinobi Mystery novels) moved Japan’s military government from Kyoto–the country’s capital, and the city where the emperor lived–to a fortified city 550 miles northeast…a city then called Edo, after its founding clan. Although

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On the Road…

This morning, I’m heading to San Francisco. Tomorrow, I catch a flight to Los Angeles, and from there to Japan. With the third Shinobi Mystery, Flask of the Drunken Master, releasing on July 14, and tons of exciting photos and stories coming up in the weeks to come, I hope you’ll make the blog a regular stop this summer…I’ll make it worth your while!

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Tying “Out of Print” Status to Sales

Older publishing contracts typically stated that a work was “in print” as long as it remained “available through standard retail channels.” Tying “in print” status to availability worked fine in the pre-ebook world, because all “available” books were in physical formats. However, in the ebook context, language tying in-print status to availability means that a book will never go out of print. A publisher could simply leave the ebook available for sale through Amazon (or other sources) and it would remain “available” forever.

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What Does an Author Pay For?

New authors–and sometimes experienced ones–may be uncertain about which parts of the publishing process the author “normally” pays for. What the author pays for differs, depending on the publishing path the author chooses. Know the standards for your choice. Traditional Publishing: the Author pays the Publisher nothing. Under the traditional publishing model, the publisher pays all costs of publication, and the author pays nothing out-of-pocket. The best contracts contain “gross royalty” provisions, where the author’s royalties are based on the publisher’s gross receipts on sales. In a gross royalty scenario, the author receives a percentage of whatever the publisher receives on sales of the

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